Check Out LSU Running Back Derrius Guice’s 650lb Back Squat

There’s no denying that football players are some of the strongest athletes outside of dedicated strength sports. The collegiate and professional level players need ridiculous strength just to hold their own on the field against the opposing 300+ lb linemen. Which brings us to our next video of LSU’s running back Derrius Guice squatting big weight.

On June 23rd, LSU’s strongside defensive end Aaron Moffitt posted a video of Guice’s recent back squat PR. The video below, shows Guice taking a 650 lb back squat for a ride wearing only a belt.

The view of the squat isn’t the best with all of the spotters around Guice. So was the squat the cleanest? No. Was it to full powerlifting depth? Eh, possibly in some federations. Regardless, it’s an impressive squat, especially when you consider the fact that Guice is 5′ 11″ and weighs around 210 lbs.

[Ever wonder why football players wear lifting straps when they Olympic lift? This article helps provide some reasoning.]

This isn’t Guice’s first time squatting big weight though. Back in March, Guice shared a video of himself taking 583 lbs for a ride, and it’s a much cleaner video compared to the 650 lb squat. Once again though, is it to depth? That’s up for viewer discretion.

Football player’s goals are often to move the most weight possible – even if it’s not the cleanest form – to prep their bodies for in-game situations and to achieve maximal strength with their limited training times. This isn’t always ideal in terms of injury prevention, but most players have lifted like this their whole lives, and their goals are different than a dedicated powerlifter.

We’ve seen our fair share of professional football players squatting big weight. Like the time Baltimore Ravens defensive tackle Michael Pierce squatted 725 lbs unbelted.

And whether you agree with their form and depth that’s up to you, but there’s no denying the strength these football players possess.

Feature image screenshot from @aarontmoffitt Twitter video. 

Comments

Previous articleBench Press Exercise Guide – Muscles Worked, Variations, and Benefits
Next articleMike Tuchscherer Finally Hits a 500-Pound Bench Press
Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.