Watch Hassan El Belghiti’s World Record 4.8x Bodyweight Deadlift

When’s the last time you saw someone a man deadlift over 4.8 times his bodyweight? If the answer was “never” you’d be in a majority. It’s a feat rarely accomplished and though it has been done on a few hallowed occasions in powerlifting history, Hassan El Belghiti has entered into a very elite club.

This week the European Equipped Powerlifting Championships have been taking place in Pilsen in the Czech Republic, the same place where last year’s IPF Open World Championships were held. (Check out some of the 4x-plus bodyweight squats from that contest here.)

The forty-three-year-old(!) French powerlifter made a pretty astonishing equipped lift of 317.5 kilograms (700 pounds) in the -66kg class, making this at least a 4.81 times bodyweight deadlift. Take a look below — he looks like he’s summoning some serious power as he completes the lockout!

During this meet he put up a mammoth total of 777.5 kilograms (1,714 pounds) — not quite world record territory, but super impressive. He also made a bench of 167.5 kilograms (missing his third attempt of 170 kiograms) and a squat of 292.5 kilograms, which he failed on the first attempt but got it on his second attempt at the weight. He tied for first with 32-year-old Russian athlete Konstantin Danilov, who totaled 777.5 pounds with a heavier bench and squat, though his deadlift was over 40 kilograms lighter than El Belghiti’s.

The deadlift beat El Belghiti’s previous world record by 2.5 kilograms. He made a 315kg (694.4lb) pull at the 2017 Wroclaw World Games and we love seeing the way he celebrates. The man works hard for his achievements.

With a 290kg squat and 167.5kg bench press, he totaled 772.5 kilograms for a well-deserved first place at that meet.

When you’re talking deadlifts that are approaching 5x bodyweight, it’s impossible to not think of Lamar Gant who was the first guy to pull over 5x with this 634-pound (287.6kg) deadlift at 123 pounds (55.8kg) bodyweight.

It’s a bit unfair to compare El Belghiti to Gant, who many consider the GOAT, but what we’re trying to say is that any powerlifter would probably be happy to be mentioned in the same sentence. And although he’s 43 years old, El Belghiti may have more records ahead of him.

Featured image via Alexander Kang on YouTube.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.