Mike O’Brien’s 315-Pound Garage Gym Ollie “World Record” Is Insane

Don't try this one at your local skatepark. Or anywhere, really.

Mike O’Brien shreds the gnar, big time. On Nov. 19, 2022, O’Brien — who maintains a respectable social media following as a weight room stunt performer and powerlifter — published one of his best antics yet for skateboarding and weightlifting fans: a 315-pound barbell Ollie

Make no mistake. This feat is firmly in “don’t try this at home” territory, even if O’Brien did knock out the trick on the deadlift platform of his garage gym. Check it out for yourself below, courtesy of O’Brien’s Instagram account:

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Despite looking a bit shaky (who could reasonably fault O’Brien for his technique, though?), O’Brien knocked out the stunt with a loaded barbell on his back and possibly the world’s sturdiest lifting belt. O’Brien cheekily declared the “lift” a new World Record in his caption. It’s a safe bet that he’s right. 

How He Did It (Probably)

Make no mistake; there’s no step-by-step walkthrough for a performance like this. You can be a world-class squatter or Tony Hawk himself on the board, but mixing the two is another beast entirely. However, you can watch O’Brien’s trick and realize what athletic qualities are required to make this happen.

Ollies are a relatively basic trick; they’re also a foundational movement in skateboarding upon which more significant, complex tricks and jumps are built. Most skaters pick up their Ollie game early — doing it with a loaded barbell on your back is another matter.

It’s a given that O’Brien needed to rely on his tremendous leg strength to pull off this maneuver. He’s displayed plenty of other crazy feats in his gym that showcase his strength, including kickflips with nearly 200 pounds:

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To stabilize the barbell while in the air, you need tremendous grip strength and upper back stability so the bar doesn’t slide or drift. O’Brien may have opted for the low bar position to physically wedge the bar into his back.

It would help if you also had a rock-solid core capable of resisting unpredictable forces and a surplus of explosive leg strength to elevate your body. Think of a squat jump, then ratchet it up a notch (or three). 

Stick the Landing

Stunts like O’Brien’s 315-pound Ollie are equally inspiring, absurd, and informative. The strength you cultivate in the weight room (or at home, if that’s your jam) is suitable for more than just moving a slightly-heavier barbell. You can do a lot with your body if you put your mind to the task.

That definitely doesn’t mean you should slap a bar onto your back and try O’Brien’s stunt for yourself. There are safer and probably more effective ways to get creative with your workouts. Still, it’s a heck of a thing to watch. 

Featured Image: @mikeymaybeme on Instagram