Oleg Chen (-69kg) Block Snatches 4 Kilograms Over the World Record

It looks like Russian weightlifter Oleg Chen just made a block snatch that was heavier than the snatch world record.

Chen, who lifts in the -69kg category, posted the following clip of a training session during which he hit two block snatches of 160 kilograms (352.7 pounds) and 170 kilograms (374.8 pounds).

The current -69kg world record in the snatch is currently held by China’s Liao Hui, who made a 166kg snatch at the 2014 World Weightlifting Championships in Kazakhstan.

Chen’s lift comes with caveats of course, the obvious being that he made the lift off of blocks, thus eliminating the first pull, and the less obvious being that he often trains around 72kg and that he also appears to be using weightlifting straps, making the lift less taxing on the grip.

[Wondering how to improve your first pull? Here are 5 strength and positioning exercises to make it stronger and more effective.]

Chen has nonetheless pulled off an extraordinary feat by block snatching four whole kilograms over Liao’s record.

As far as full snatches go, the heaviest we’ve seen from him lately was this amazing 150-kilogram (330.7lb) snatch from the 2017 European Championships, which earned him first place in the lift. This is the best save we’ve seen in some time.

He followed that up with a clean & jerk of 169 kilograms (372.6lb), which earned him sixth place in that lift.

[If you love dramatic weightlifting saves, watch these two athletes fight like crazy to save their lifts!]

Chen, who earned gold at the 2013 and 2014 European Championships, took home silver at the 2017 European Championships and he also earned silver at the Weightlifting World Championships in 2011, 2013, and 2015.

He did not compete at this year’s WWC since Russia, along with China and 7 other countries, received a one-year ban from international competition following anti-doping violations.

That clearly hasn’t stopped him from training hard, though. We’re looking forward to seeing the lifts he puts up once he returns to competition.

Featured image via @chenoleg on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.