After Knee Replacement, Vlad Alhazov Becomes the First to Squat 500Kg Raw With Wraps

Five hundred kilograms. One thousand, one hundred and two pounds.

It’s a rare thing to find a human being who can get under that kind of weight without crumpling like a tin can, but Ukrainian powerlifter Vlad Alhazov got under the bar, bent his tightly-wrapped knees, and officially squatted 500 kilograms at an IPA meet this weekend. With a 395kg (870lb) deadlift and a 230kg (507lb) bench press, he totaled 1125kg (2480.2lb).

No, he didn’t walk it out like he’d have to in the IPF, but darn it, a 500kg raw squat deserves some serious respect. This absolutely shattered the previous world record from Andrey Malanichev — he hit a 485kg (1069lb) squat in October last year.

This is a goal Alhazov has been quietly working toward for a while now, and while his online footprint isn’t huge (and his Instagram is private), we did find a clip of him hitting a squat of 485 kilograms a few weeks ago in Israel. It looks like he’s wearing wraps here, too.

Note that this 485kg squat was a personal record for Alhazov, and he only just hit it on July 4. It took him less than three weeks to move his PR from 485kg to 500kg.

Like we said, there’s not a ton of information out there about Vlad Alhazov, which is all the more unusual because once upon a time, he held the IPA world record for the equipped squat too: 567kg (1,250 pounds).

This was almost ten years ago, shortly before Alhazov suffered a serious knee injury trying to squat (equipped) 590kg (1,300 pounds) at Westside Barbell. His knee caved inward on the descent, which ultimately necessitated a full knee replacement.

Yup, Vlad Alhazov has squatted 500kg with a replaced knee. (Whether or not it was replaced with a hydraulic press, we can’t be sure.) This one was truly a squat for the history books.

Featured image via Power Mafia on YouTube.

Comments

Previous articleCrossFit Team Series Takes New Formatting for 2017
Next articleAmit Sapir Is the First Man to Hold the Squat Record in 4 Weight Classes Simultaneously
Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.