How to Vote for the IWF’s Lifter of the Year

It’s January, which means the International Weightlifting Federation has opened up voting for the 2017 IWF Lifter of the Year — and the competition is fierce.

The 2016 winners were Iran’s Kianoush Rostami and Thailand’s Sopita Tanasan, both of whom won gold at the Rio Olympics.

[Sopita Tanasan discussed meditation and motivation in a rare interview with BarBend — read it here!]

When voting was opened to decide the 2016 winners, there were six candidates of each sex, but this year the number has been cut down to five men and five women. Tanasan is a contender once again, though Rostami didn’t make the cut this time around — possibly because an injury at the World Weightlifting Championship prevented him from completing any clean & jerks.

We’ve listed all ten nominees below, each of whom won the world champion title for their weight class.

Male Athletes

Ihab Mahmoud, -77kg, Egypt

Arley Mendez, -85kg, Chile

Sohrab Moradi, -94kg, Iran

Francisco Mosquera Valencia, -62kg, Colombia

Lasha Talakhadze, +105kg, Georgia

Female Athletes

Kuo Hsing-Chun, -58kg, Taipei

Chanu Saikhon Mirabai, -48kg, India

Sarah Robles, +90kg, USA

Sopita Tanasan,-53kg, Thailand

Lidia Valentin Perez, -75kg, Spain

[Check out Sarah Robles’ massive 205-kilogram front squat she made during her training for the World Championship!]

The winners will each receive a Jenő Boskovics Lifter of the Year Trophy. It’s named after the Hungarian weightlifting journalist who worked as the Press Chief and Spokesman of the IWF for several decades and served as the editor-in-chief of World Weightlifting Magazine from 1980 until his death in 2010.

If you want to help decide who takes home the trophy and the title of Lifter of the Year, head over to the voting page right here to make your voice heard. Just don’t spend too much time landing on your choice, as voting closes on January 31st.

Featured image via @iwfnet on Instagram.

Comments

Previous articleThe Secret to This 71-Year-Old’s World Record Mile: Lots of Strength Training
Next articlePowerlifting Grandma Hopes to Secure 300 Pound Deadlift By May
Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.