Here’s What One of the World’s Strongest Vegans Eats for Breakfast

During his recent trip to Canada, during which he had an epic lift-off with Cal Strength’s Spencer Moorman, Irish weightlifter and YouTube personality Clarence Kennedy recorded a full day of eating with his pal Omar Isuf.

There are a couple of reasons why this is notable. First, Kennedy is insanely strong — his best lifts are a 185kg snatch and a 220kg clean & jerk at about 100kg bodyweight.

The second reason is that he’s a vegan. (He made those lifts both before and after his transition to veganism in 2016.) And let’s be honest, vegans are often associated with protein deficiency, anemia, and skinniness.

That’s the fourth of seven pause squat singles of 260 kilograms (573 pounds).

[We named Clarence one of the 5 strongest vegans on Earth. Check out the full list!]

So we were curious when Kennedy told us about this upcoming video that followed his diet for a day. And while the video does do that, we weren’t sure if we could call it a “day” of his diet since they appear to spend the second half of the day eating fried vegan cheat food instead of carefully calculated weightlifting fuel.

But here’s the most useful info we got.

The Protein

On average, the man eats about 4,000 calories per day and 150 grams of protein. His groceries on this day included, in rough order of “protein-rich” to “not quite as protein rich”:

  • Firm tofu
  • Vegan “ground meat”
  • Chickpeas
  • Lentils
  • Chocolate soy milk
  • Peanut butter
  • Hummus
  • Flaxseed
  • Oatmeal
  • Rice
  • Grapes
  • Dates
  • Shredded coconut
  • Miscellaneous vegetables

If you’re wondering where the protein powder is, Kennedy has said in the past that he usually doesn’t consume the stuff.

Image via OmarIsuf on YouTube.

The Breakfast

  • A bowl of fruit with apples, grapes, and cherries
  • A bowl of oatmeal
  • 2 cups of chocolate soy milk
  • 4 tbsp peanut butter

According to Isuf, that made 1458 calories, 50 grams of protein, 220 grams of carbs, and 42 grams of fat.

After this, the two eat some vegan takeout (mostly beans, tofu, and vegetables) and then go ham on deep fired vegan mac ‘n’ cheese balls.

If you’re left wondering what a full day of eating would look like when he’s paying attention to his calories, micronutrients, and amino acids, check out the video above (and our discussion here) that provides a lot more detail. And get ready for a lot of beans, pasta, and soy!

Image via @clarencekennedy_ on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.