Harrison Maurus PR’d His Snatch With 150kg

Harrison Maurus is continuing his meteoric rise as one of the United States’ most promising young weightlifters. The 17-year-old, -77kg athlete is well-known in the weightlifting community for his fantastic clean & jerk — he currently holds junior world record in the lift with 192kg (422lb), which he set at the 2017 Youth World Championship in April.

It might be fair to say that his clean & jerk is generally considered his best lift. At Youth Worlds, his 140kg snatch was the second heaviest snatch, and four other -77kg athletes beat his 142kg snatch at this year’s Pan American Weightlifting Championships (which, to be fair, was a Senior competition).

But Maurus has clearly been working hard on the lift. Take a look at this snatch of 150 kilograms (330.7 pounds) that he recently made in training. This is a new PR for the athlete.

The caption simply reads, “150kg!!! Did this after waves of triples and doubles first! (…) #finally”

On Reddit, Maurus’ coach Kevin Simons gave a little more detail on the training session:

This was after 115/3, 125/2, 120/3, 130/2, 125/3, 135/2, 140/2, 145x (…)

the weights were pre planned for the most part. He had to make it perfect to go up each wave. He practically powered 140 on his first rep. There was no reason to miss 145. (…)

I hardly ever let an athlete go up after a miss, but I knew he was capable of it so let him go for it.

He also said that he is expecting the young weightlifter to pull off a double bodyweight snatch at this year’s World Weightlifting Championships, which will be held in Anaheim, California between November 28 and December 6.

More precisely, he said that he’s expecting a 154kg (339.5lb) snatch and a 198kg (436.5lb) clean & jerk, which would award Maurus a new youth world record total (352kg/776lb) and clean & jerk.

Keep in mind that this past April, Maurus PRd his total with 332kg (732lb): a 140kg snatch and 192kg clean & jerk. This would be adding 20 kilograms to his total in about 7 months.

That’s a big jump, but hey, we’ve learned not to underestimate Harrison Maurus.

Featured image via @harrison_maurus on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.