Check Out Mart Seim’s Crazy Fast (and Heavy) Press and Squat Complex

Estonian superheavyweight Mart Seim has given us another glimpse into the kind of training it takes to hit clean & jerks that regularly exceed 220 kilograms (485lb) on the platform. Take a look at this very, very quick complex of two strict(ish) presses and two back squats at 160 kilograms (352.7 pounds).

All Things Gym captured the action for their Instagram account:

For a guy who we’ve seen squat 210 kilograms for twenty freaking reps, the most impressive part of this complex is clearly the strict press. A hundred and sixty kilos for two reps is no joke, and with that that kind of pressing strength, we imagine that Seim could potentially be one of the truly great strongmen if he decided to change sports.

[World’s strongest man Eddie Hall actually flirted with the idea of switching to weightlifting. Here’s why he didn’t go through it.]

We also spied him hitting it an eight-rep set of strict presses at 150 kilograms last month, so his 1-rep max is probably well over 180 kilograms.

Lately, Seim seems to have been ramping up his training as he prepares for the World Weightlifting Championships in Anaheim. Just a couple of weeks ago, we saw him hit a jerk of 255 kilograms (562.2 pounds) at a training camp in Ukraine, which was the heaviest we’ve ever seen from the man. His competition best clean & jerk is 248 kilograms (546.7lb).

That said, we haven’t seen him post any max cleans all year. Will he hit a new clean & jerk at Worlds? It’s a little tough to tell — the heaviest single we’ve seen him make lately was 230 kilograms.

[Most of the heaviest clean & jerks in history were made in the 1980s. Take a look at our video roundup of the heaviest clean & jerks ever made in competition!]

But we think he’s got a pretty decent shot at exceeding his competition max. The superheavyweights are scheduled to compete on Tuesday, December 5. Here’s how to watch ‘em live!

Featured image via @atginsta on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.