NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Isolate Review — The Monkfruit Makes It

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Nutrabio is based in Middlesex, New Jersey, and the company has been around for about 20 years. They sell an impressive variety of health and fitness supplements like vitamins, minerals, protein, fat burners, and even apparel, but we wanted to try their grass-fed whey protein isolate. Here’s what we learned about the chocolate flavor.

Shop Grass-Fed Whey HERE.

NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Isolate Nutrition

One scoop contains 110 calories: 25 grams of protein and 2 grams of carbohydrates. There’s no information about the fat content or the cholesterol content or the sugar content — it’s probably zero, given this is a whey isolate, but I would have like more transparent labeling.

As far as micronutrients go, there’s a solid dose of calcium with 15 percent of the recommended daily intake per scoop, and it’s also relatively low in sodium with 4 percent of the RDI. With 10 percent of the RDI, it’s also unusually high in magnesium.

[Check out our top whey protein picks]

NutraBio Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate Ingredients

NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Isolate Ingredients

The first ingredient, of course, is grass-fed whey isolate. That’s whey that’s been processed in a way that removes most of the fat and carbs.

Sunflower lecithin was added to improve mixability.

One thing I liked was that the rest of the ingredients are listed by their weight, which is extremely unusual in whey supplements: one scoop contains 600mg of “natural flavor,” 500mg of natural cocoa powder, 350mg of xanthan gum, 170mg of monkfruit extract, and 125mg of stevia leaf extract.

NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Isolate Benefits and Effectiveness

There are no artificial flavors, colors, sweeteners, or preservatives in this product. Some people might be glad to learn that it’s also been cold-processed, meaning it wasn’t heated during its production and the protein hasn’t been denatured. There’s likely not too much wrong with denatured protein — we denature it ourselves when we consume it — but there’s nonetheless a market for people who prefer their whey to be cold-processed.

NutraBio Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate Review

It’s notable that it contains sunflower lecithin and not soy lecithin, which is much more common. Lecithin is simply included to improve mixability.

It’s also worth pointing out that unlike a lot of “natural” protein powders, NutraBio has included monkfruit extract, a popular sweetener made from a melon that’s also known as luo han guo.

There’s also xanthan gum, a thickener and stabilizer that’s usually derived from corn, soy, or wheat. A small percentage of people experience flatulence or indigestion when they consume xanthan gum, which is one reason why some supplement companies include digestive enzymes with their whey. NutraBio decided against including digestive enzymes so if your stomach is particularly sensitive to gums, this may not be for you.

NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Price

Two pounds costs $50, and provides about 30 servings. That comes to $1.60 per serving or 6.6 cents per gram of protein.

That’s pricy for a whey protein, but for a grass-fed whey protein, it’s not so bad. It’s about as much as the whey isolates from Jay Robb or Xwerks. It’s cheaper than the grass=fed whey concentrates from SFH or Naked Nutrition, but it’s more expensive than those from Legion and Muscle Feast. It’s about middle of the road.

NutraBio Grass-Fed Whey Protein Isolate Review

NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Taste

I tried the chocolate flavor, which was pretty darn tasty. A lot of naturally-flavored whey doubles down on the cocoa to make an earthy, dark chocolate flavor. But NutraBio’s product is surprisingly sweet and milky. It’s excellent with milk and I’d say with water, it’s above average. It’s still watery and not that strong, but significantly sweeter than most of its naturally-flavored competitors.

Mixability

Given that it doesn’t contain soy lecithin, I was expecting to find this to mix poorly. However, sunflower lecithin did the job well and while it doesn’t dissolve into the water, it’s not grainy as you drink it. It did a great job.

The Takeaway

For a product that’s free from artificial sweeteners, this is well-priced and tasty to boot, a quality I attribute to the unusual combination of cocoa, stevia, and monkfruit. I would have liked a slightly more transparent label and perhaps some digestive enzymes, but if you don’t have issues with gum you probably won’t have issues with this product.

NutraBio Naturals Grass-Fed Whey Isolate

Per Serving: 1.60
8

Ingredients

9.0/10

Effectiveness

8.0/10

Price

6.0/10

Taste

8.0/10

Mixability

9.0/10

Pros

  • No lactose
  • No artificial ingredients
  • No soy

Cons

  • Contains xanthan gum
  • No digestive enzymes
  • Doesn't include sugar/fat/cholesterol content

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.