In case you missed it, we recently wrote a piece on Cailer Woolam and his impressive 900 lb deadlift. This new max gained a lot of attention because Woolam performed it at 206 lbs and used a hook grip.

This lift not only highlights Woolam’s potential with deadlifting, but may put him as one of the better pound for pound deadlifters in the world.

A video posted by Cailer Woolam (@cailerc40) on

Normally Woolam competes in the raw 220 weight class and has a recorded highest competition deadlift at 804 lbs. When it comes to deadlifting, Woolam definitely possesses some forms of raw power others don’t. In his Instagram bio he even writes, “Kind of just a deadlift guy who competes full power.”

An athlete who can produce such a big lift at a decimal bodyweight like Woolam is always intriguing. What do they have that’s different than the rest of us at similar body weights? Is it there set up? Their mental prep, or training?

On the quest to find what gave Woolam the push to crush this new impressive max, I reached out to learn more.

About His 900 lb Deadlift and Self-Hype

1. When you pulled 900, did you plan on hitting 900 specifically?

Woolam: I had been wanting to attempt 900 for some time, as I knew it was within my capabilities. I was driving home from work that day and decided that would be the day I was going to do it.

2. Do you always pull with a double-overhand grip?

Woolam: Overhand grip in my opinion is superior to the mixed grip. You can engage your back much more efficiently. You do all of your bent over rows, pull ups, and shrugs with a double overhand grip.

A photo posted by Cailer Woolam (@cailerc40) on

That is the position you have developed your back to be the strongest in. So to me…a double overhand grip is a must for deadlift. And for sumo as well as my underhand does get in the way at the top of the lift.

3. Do you have any tips on hyping yourself up for big lifts?

Woolam: As for hype for a day like this. It all starts on the drive over. I just think about everything that has angered me recently along with emotions of how badly I want this lift. Once I’m in the gym warming up I do a lot of pacing in-between each set, along with listening to my favorite songs.

While I am angry I do stay calm and collected. And then turn complete savage as soon as it’s time to lift. Nose tork is a must right before a lift! I save all adrenaline up until it’s time to lift.

On Current Competitions and Future Plans

4. You’ve competed at 220, but are sitting around 198 currently (206 lbs when he pulled 900) – is your plan to stay around 198?

Woolam: I do plan to stay at 198 and be as competitive as possible in that weight class – total wise. However, I am currently chasing the all time deadlift record at 198 and do plan to hit the all time record at 220 after.

A photo posted by Cailer Woolam (@cailerc40) on

Maybe even the 242 record someday as well. (Depending on what Belkin gets it up to…haha) but for full power and total, I will stay 198 as long as possible and chase a 2000 total.

5. What are your current best competition lifts?

Woolam: My current best competition lifts are 573 squat, 414 bench, and a 815 deadlift. 1802 total in knee sleeves.

A video posted by Cailer Woolam (@cailerc40) on

6. What are your future plans for competition starting this year?

Woolam: I would like to get in about 4 competitions a year, which is more that I did last year. What sparked this was that I decided to become more serious about competing, hence why I dropped to 198.

I will most likely compete in wraps moving forward since I have knee issues that hold be back. My next meet will be February 11th in corpus Christi!

Woolam’s impressive new max has definitely raised some eye brows in the powerlifting community. He has big plans for his career moving forward, so it will be fun to see what 2017 has in store for him.

Feature image from @cailerc40 Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.