Kimberly Walford Deadlifts a Huge 250kg, Seven Kilos Over Her World Record

Thirty-nine-year-old powerlifter Kimberly Walford made a deadlift this weekend that exceeded her IPF raw world record by seven kilograms (15.4 pounds). That record is held in the -72kg weight class and while it’s not totally clear how much she weighs right now, this is nonetheless an extraordinary lift with some very extraordinary hype. This clip is worth watching before you try your next max deadlift.

Who wouldn’t PR with Ray Williams cheering them on like that?

Swedish world record holder Isabella Von Weissenberg popped into the comments section to say, “Incredible job Kim 😍 you’re unlimited!” to which Walford replied, “thank you Sis, I’m excited for the possibilities.”

The lift was made at a meet hosted by Walford and IPF world record holder Ray Williams called the Kim & Ray Speed Power Strength Invitational 2018, held at Speed Power Strength Gym in Oakland, California. Walford and Williams weren’t competing and lifted after the meet was over.

Walford holds two IPF deadlift world records in the -63kg class (221kg/487.2lb) and the -72kg class (243kg/535.7lb) as well as the -72kg world record total (540kg/1,190.5lb).

[Walford and 9 other athletes shared the reasons they started powerlifting in this eye-opening article.]

 She posted with her lift,

The Speed Power Strength crew put on amazing meet. Ray and I lifted after the meet. It felt great to pay homage to all the people who attended the meet. Thank you guys for coming , supporting, and being a part of the powerlifting family!!

At the same meet, Williams himself made a squat of 467 kilograms (1,030 pounds), a weight that’s almost 98 percent of his world record 477.5kg (1,053lb) lift from last year’s Arnold Classic. Watch his latest lift below.

[Williams took 1,003 pounds for a double just last week — read the article to hear him discuss in detail the reasons behind his squat depth.]

We’re certainly hoping the Kim & Ray Speed Power Strength Invitational becomes a regular event.

Featured image via @trackfu on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.