Watch Kirill Sarychev Bench 529 Pounds for 10 Reps

Enormous man Kirill Sarychev is letting you know that he’s still one of the world’s most prodigious bench pressers on the planet. The mighty Russian still posts the occasional lifting video in between performing his duties as the president of the World Raw Powerlifting Federation, and this week he has shown an astonishing 10-rep set of 529 pounds (240kg). (His most recent bodyweight is listed as 179kg, a little under 395 pounds.)

Given how smooth the reps are, you could almost think he was warming up with the bar.

We think he threw in that long pause on the final rep just to show how much more he’s capable of.

This comes only a couple of months after he nailed a world record raw powerlifting total at the SN Pro Strong Expo in Moscow. Competing in the super heavyweight division, he squatted 360kg (793.7 lb), benched 320kg (705.5 lb), and deadlifted 402.5kg (887.4 lb) for a total of 1,082.5kg (2386.5lb).

Sarychev, of course, also holds the all-time world record in the raw bench press, having lifted 335kg (738.5lb) at the 2015 SN Pro Strong Expo, which he performed wearing nothing but a singlet and a couple of wrist wraps.

As in his ten-rep lift above, Sarychev barely looks like he’s breaking a sweat as he shatters the world record — the lift looks as smooth as a warm-up. (Although we’re sure his shoulders felt a little funky the next day.) Meanwhile, Eddie Hall has gone on record to say that if he trained specifically for the bench, he thinks he could beat Sarychev’s record with six months of training time. We’ll believe it when we see it.

Featured image via @sarychevkirill on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.