Hulda B. Waage, 30, added another record to her list of powerlifting accomplishments. At her last meet, Waage recorded a 205kg (452 lb) equipped squat, which earned her the -84kg Women’s Kraft IPF Iceland record. This record will be added to her all-time equipped national bench press record, which she holds for single lift and full meet at 120kg (264 lb). In addition to her squat and bench, she’s recorded an impressive 185kg (407 lb) deadlift and totaled 480kg at her best equipped meet. 

Waage has also competed raw in her powerlifting career, recording impressive numbers such as a 147.5kg squat, 85kg bench press, and 160kg deadlift. While only competitively powerlifting for a little over two years now, Waage continues to build quite a name for herself – not only for her lifting, but for her diet as well.

Waage practices a vegan diet, which we’re seeing become more common in elite athletes. This past year we saw three-time Olympian Kendrick Farris choose a vegan diet in prep for the Rio Olympics. To gain a better understanding about Waage’s powerlifting career and dietary choices – I reached out and asked her a few questions.

Jake Boly: Congrats on the new squat record. Did you expect to hit the 452 lb squat that meet?  

Hulda B. Waage: This was the second time I squatted this weight, the first time was at training. The squat attempt before the 205kg was so easy, and then I knew it was a good day. It was actually so light, I look forward to hitting a new record in the future.

Boly: What is the official record title? Also, what are the other records you hold?

Waage: At the moment I hold two equipped bench press records 120kg (side note, I’ve hit 140kg in training) – for single lift bench press and at a powerlifting meet. Now I have this 205kg equipped squat record. All of these are Icelandic records for the -84kg Women’s Kraft IPF category.

Boly: What made you want to make the switch from a traditional diet?

Waage: First, for environmental reasons. I love our planet and want my daughters to live on a cleaner and better earth. Also, for personal health reasons.

Boly: To wrap up – any tips for a lifter who wants to try a vegan diet? Any special considerations?

Waage: Try to be as plant based as possible. At first, be patient when trying to figure things out. A good idea for macro goals are: 20-30% protein, 15-20% fat, and 55-60% carbohydrates. There is a little protein in everything, except of course water.

Feature image from @huldabwaage Instagram page

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.